monospaced fonts

Don’t use these either

The system fonts Courier, Monaco, and Con­so­las are exam­ples of mono­spaced fonts, so named because every char­ac­ter is the same width. When the char­ac­ters vary in width, the font is called pro­por­tional.

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz!
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz!
Jill, did you buy the milk?
Jill, did you buy the milk?

The sam­ples above are set at the same point size. But the mono­spaced font (first and third rows) takes up more hor­i­zon­tal space than the pro­por­tional font (sec­ond and fourth rows). The dif­fer­ences are most notice­able in char­ac­ters that are nar­row in the pro­por­tional font (like f i j l r t) and the punc­tu­a­tion char­ac­ters.

Mono­spaced fonts were invented to meet the mechan­i­cal require­ments of type­writ­ers. They were not invented to win beauty con­tests. Com­pared to pro­por­tional fonts, mono­spaced fonts are harder to read. And because they take up more hor­i­zon­tal space,  you’ll always get fewer words per page with a mono­spaced font.

There are no good rea­sons to use mono­spaced fonts. So don’t. Use pro­por­tional fonts.